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Where to Get a Christmas Tree in Cumming

How to pick out the best tree for your home, preference and price point.

There are plenty of places around Cumming to pick out this year's Christmas tree, including:

Bottoms Tree Farm is located at 5880 John Burrus Road in Cumming. They are a family owned and run small business that offers choose and cut trees, fresh cut Fraser firs. This tree lot is sure to start traditions as families select a tree, have it cut down for them (or do it yourself with a loaned saw) and delivered by the Bottoms family themselves. They are open Monday through Friday from 3 p.m. until dark, Saturdays, 9 a.m. until dark and they are closed on Sundays. They only accept cash or checks. Visit their Facebook page for updates.

Big John's Christmas Tree Lot is one location at Lakeland Plaza in front of Kroger at GA 400 and Highway 20 in Cumming. Trees from this family run business come from the United States and Canada and families can hand pick the trees and then have them delivered to their home. They can be delivered or delivered and set up starting from $25 and they have issued a coupon here as well. They are open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily.

Home Depot and Lowe's have fresh cut trees starting around $20. Both stores have a large variety of lights, outdoor decor items, ornaments and indoor decorations for the season.

Pike Nurseries has a variety of trees, wreaths and fresh garland available for shoppers. Customers will find trees priced from $29.99.

Tents, Tents, Tents is in a new location, 1290 Buford Highway (east of Randy's Auto Center) in Cumming. They offer pre-cut trees as well as wreathes and garland for holiday shoppers. The tented location is open now through Sunday, Dec. 16, from 2 p.m. until 8 p.m.

Kinsey Family Farm is located at 7170 Jot-em Down Road in Cumming. Choose and cut a variety of trees including, Leyland Cypress, Carolina Sapphire, Naylor's Blue, and Blue Ice Christmas trees. Pre-cut Fraser fir, Concolor fir and Douglas fir – all trees are sheltered and on display in water. Enjoy music, roast marshmallows, and warm up on hot chocolate at the barn. Take a free wagon ride through their 35-acre tree plantation. The farm has wreaths, garlands, tree stands, lasting memories and much more. Kinsey Family Farm is open now through Thursday, Dec. 20. Monday through Friday, noon to 7 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

With so many options, picking out a Christmas tree can sometimes make you feel like you're in "A Charlie Brown Christmas." Any given tree can either be too short, too tall, too bald, too bushy or have a myriad of other problems.

So how can you tell which tree is the right one for you? To help select your favorite tree, the characteristics of the more popular species are listed below.

Douglas fir:  This tree is generally available as a sheared tree and is the most common species found on tree lots.

It has a nice fragrance and a medium-to-good shelf life. Because of the thick, bushy crowns, they do not lend themselves to large or heavy decorations. 

This species is the easiest to grow because it is relatively problem-free.  It requires seven to eight years to mature as a Christmas tree.

Noble fir:  This species is considered the “Cadillac” of Christmas trees.  It grows in a more open pattern, has stout branches, luxurious green needles, a long shelf life and a nice fragrance.  It is popular with families that have large or heavy ornaments.

It is the most expensive tree because it takes eight to ten years to mature and is the most difficult species to grow. 

Grand fir:  This sheared tree is the most fragrant of the native species.  It has an attractive needle that makes it a popular choice as a flocked tree.

Grand fir trees require eight to nine years to grow and have a medium shelf life.

Fraser fir:  This North Carolina native has strong branches that will hold heavier ornaments.  The needles have a pleasant fragrance and a long shelf life comparable to a noble fir.

Fraser fir trees are difficult to grow because of the many pests that threaten them. They require eight to 10 years before they are ready for harvest.

Norway and blue spruce trees: These are generally available only at choose-and-cut farms.  They will hold heavy decorations.  Some consumers think they are child- and pet-proof because of the stiff, prickly needles.

Spruces require eight to nine years to mature as Christmas trees and have a medium shelf life.

Tips for caring for your tree:

Once you make it home with your tree, cut one-quarter inch off the butt and place the tree in a water stand.  The stand should be large enough to hold at least one gallon of water after the tree is placed in it.  Check the water level daily.  A typical six-foot tall tree can drink one gallon of water each day and remain fresh for two to three weeks.

TELL US: Where did you buy or cut your Christmas tree in the Cumming area? What kind is it? Share in the comments below.

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